Kurt Cobain & Eddie Vedder: The Grunge Battle

kurt&eddieGrungeOfEmerald

Kurt Cobain did not hate Eddie Vedder neither did Eddie hated Cobain. Hate is such a strong word to describe what seemed to be a temporary brawl or dispute of interest that happens awfully a lot in the industry. Thus, our cyber Einstein’s had made it their mission to further pursue the subject into the modern century as they drool over the issue for years if not decades. While that is extremely admirable if the intentions are purely focused on keeping the memories alive, but most often than not, the information supplied to the thesis are usually untrue and in some cases are exaggerated beyond the whole biblical truth.

Remember that we have all gone through a phase of ‘devil-may-care’ attitude and some of us has even been beaten for the fortitude. Just like that 23 years ago our dear grunge prince Kurt Cobain and our favourite grunge ambassador Eddie Vedder were kids and that will further testify to the whole ‘life begins at 40s’ ideology. Even if we believe that Vedder grew up way ahead of his years for amassing such a graceful and professional attitude over the whole dispute that was truly nothing to begin with, sometimes some childish behaviour are totally unavoidable.

1991 was the year where Nirvana drove punk in simultaneously pushing the claustrophobic envelope further into the pop shiny spectrum by breaking the barriers of Seattle’s inner layers of subversive music and the lateral universe of rock stardom. The achievement was reached in such biblical ways that it broke out as a pandemonium that was beyond words. But to say that the late frontman of Nirvana, Kurt Cobain was the forefather of Grunge or Punk would truly be an overstatement to the actual thesis for neither, he nor Eddie was the forefather of Grunge. Punk was already there, its seed was already planted, and the ones who planted this would stretch way back in history so for now let’s just stick to the subterranean facts of Seattle underground culture and its propellers who were none other than Andy Wood (January 8, 1966 – March 19, 1990)  Mother Love Bone, Chris Cornell of Soundgarden and Mudhoney among others.

tumblr_mrmht6gC4e1r7m99yo1_500

This was evident through their earliest work such as Apple, which was released 3 months (July 1990) after Mother Love Bone’s frontman decease. Mother Love Bone in its inception was predicted to become one of the greatest bands in due time and Andy Wood as the first of the big-league Seattle rock star.

The truth could be that Pearl Jam were one of the first representative of punk rock in its purest form but that does not cut of Nirvana from the scheme as Bleach was the proof to Nirvana’s notability as a very functional band that will lead the whole underground pandemonium to such exceptional heights. While ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ earned its keep in the Nirvana’s vault, Ten did it for Pearl Jam as they continued to uplift the culture forward. However, to the British media’s dismay, NME published an article stating that Pearl Jam was just trying to steal money from young alternative kid’s pockets and  Cobain further instigated the statement with his own version of: Pearl Jam being commercial sellouts and argued that Ten was not a true alternative album because it had to many prominent guitar lead.

Oh well, the so called commercial sell out who were trying to steal money from the young alternative kids pockets actually retreated from limelight and would rather not earn a single keep as long as their fans were being cheated by Ticketmaster who subjected fans to an extra fee for service charges. So yeah, so much for being the commercial sell-out they weren’t.

The publicity shy Eddie Vedder who almost quit music in 1993 due to the intense pressure the band had to face at their prime stated that none of them would be here if it wasn’t for Nirvana. It was to Vedder’s mastery that he took the negative and converted it into such positive vibes that the two finally came into an agreement and the dispute was forever lost.

In a 1992 Interview Kurt Cobain finally stated:

I’m bowing down gracefully and taking off my crown and I’m giving it over to Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam. He’s now the representative of the youth of America – October 30, 1992

When asked if he was doing so in favour of his newfound role as a father and husband, he replied:

‘Because Eddie Vedder stole my looks, and wears it better than I’

Oh well, we were all jealous of Eddie Vedder at one point that we could and would all die for his ‘Greek-God’ looks and Golden Baritones as much as his overall charismatic and humble poise. So we can relate to Cobain and his tiny little pang of jealousy towards Vedder when they were both still too young to notice anything below the music they were so engulfed with.

Kurt Cobain on the other hand was just living up to his own words of:

I’d rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I am not.

That seems admirable but he would later come out and say that Eddie was the nicest person in the industry. Thanks Cobain for making us confuse just like you. But as we all know, there was no love lost between the two. It was the kindred spirits kind of dispute that even passes through the relationships of blood brothers. And the story ended well for the two with a solid slow dance and watching the beautiful moment the two shared backstage, we were almost flinching on our seats thinking that even Cobain would end up smooching Eddie that day the was Kiedis did. Poor Eddie got ‘French-ed’ earlier in the day when Anthony Kiedis grabbed him for a lovey-dovey Frenchy’

Eddie Vedder further quotes to the moments below:

You see Kurt looking over and go like this (puts finger to lips) and it’s not saying, ‘Don’t tell anybody’ or ‘Keep the lid on this little private moment.’ It was actually because on the stage above us, Eric Clapton was playing ‘Tears In Heaven’.